Nature Deficiency Syndrome – most Americans suffer from it

Nature Deficit Disorder is a very real thing. For those of us who have spent a lifetime working in and enjoying the Great Out Doors, this is guaranteed fact. I live in a big city and I love walking. I try to walk whenever I can rather than driving there. Mapping out my walks with the help of a map app shows I clock between 10-12 miles per week. Although my routes are not what anyone would consider nature walks, exercising in fresh air and sunshine is good medicine. I have no idea what biochemical effects I receive from working in my garden 6 hours a day – but I know it’s good.

This post quotes the good Dr. Mercola with a link to solutions from Japan.

nature deficit cure
Sunchokes reaching for the sky

“Americans spend 80 to 99 percent of their lives indoors — a trend that has led to “nature deficit disorder,” a term used to describe a lifestyle deficit that contributes to poor psychological and physical health”

nature breathe deep
Passionflower vines defying gravity

“Ecotherapy employs methods that cultivate the health benefits of being in nature. Research shows nature therapy lowers anxiety and depression, improves self-esteem, reduces blood pressure and more”

“Spending time outdoors can significantly lift your mood, and outdoors activities such as gardening and nature hikes have been found to be good therapy”

Outside Good For Inside – Dr. Mercola

 

Author: herb guy

Just another Blacksmith who retired after way too long and got back to the garden in just the nick of time. My organic herb garden is my pride and joy. Ask me about Lyme disease. I spend most of my time nibbling my way through my garden while chatting up my chickens.

2 thoughts on “Nature Deficiency Syndrome – most Americans suffer from it”

  1. 100% agree! I find that Fernweh feeling grow into unbearable levels unless I get out and practice earthing. Or else I may be compelled to run away. As a Yogi, sun salutations at dawn are magical. Nature is the world’s anxiety reliever.

  2. That’s the one thing I miss about living in the city, the ability to walk out the door and street hike. We used to do that for hours on end. And there seems to be a connection with walking and memory, as conversations later are connected to and recalled according to location. It’s a bit ironic that country living in not really conducive to casual sauntering anymore. Thoreau weeps:
    https://goo.gl/yUAV1v

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